This week, and for the beginning of second quarter, we would like to highlight one of our members Joseph “JB” Covington! Last year he completed his FIRST triathlon during Rock Hall with an Olympic distance, and already into 2018, and he has completed his second triathlon race in Smithfield, VA at the Smithfield Sprint! JB had another life milestone last year when featured on the TV show “The Voice!” with his church choir for their talents in gospel music. Even with all of life’s  successes, there were also hardships. JB’s 2017 did not closeout the way he intended, and yet he still pushes through! He is such an inspiration and added value to the team!  Read below on how this NY native, and Tuskegee University graduate, got into triathlons and continues his courage to keep going!

 

 

“How District Tri has impacted my life:

I have always had a zest and zeal for physical competition from football to swimming in my youth to running marathons in adulthood.  A couple years ago I wanted something more challenging, something that would push me beyond the limits that marathon training had done for me.  So I came up with the idea of doing triathlons.  I wasn’t all to sure how to train effectively for such a sport so I did some research.  After continually training I never signed up for a race.  Fast forward a couple years I mentioned interest for the sport to an acquaintance and he introduced me to District Tri.  Instantly I was excited to join the movement. I started going to all the workouts to just become a better athlete overall. But being a part of this team meant you had to put your money where your mouth is.  When racing season opened up everyone began signing up for races.  I had always talked about doing a race but never carried out the plan.  Mid season when the majority of the team had completed their first race ever or first race of the season they began to call out those who had not yet accomplished the goal of completing a race.  Questions began to be asked like what race do you plan on doing? When will you sign up for your first race? So i signed up officially for Rock Hall Tri Olympic distance.  Trained super hard leading up to the race and conquered it! While training I noticed slight health complications but didn’t think much of them.  I ended up completing the race but at the finish line a teammate noticed me bleeding from my side and I quickly attributed it to chaffing. Fast forward a few weeks found out I actually had CANCER! Everything came to a screeching holt. I ended up being hospitalized from complications.  I told a few members of the team that I trusted what was going on with my health and was immediately supported.  I then decided to go public with my diagnosis in order to be transparent to help others that might be dealing the same or similar situation.  I then informed my entire team and from that point forward it was an overwhelming outpouring of love.  This summer I had to find a way to get back to a place where my body was in shape to basic daily activities.  I knew I had to have the heart of a fighter to see the progress I desired to see.  By me sharing my story it gave District Tri a way to support me in ways I never knew I needed.  Calls texts prayers and well wishes began to flow my way.  Everyone just wanted to be a blessing in my life. Visitor after visitor teammate after teammate.  The questions began to be asked to what do we have to do to get you training again?  My answer was I have to get my left leg under control and back down to size.  I wanted to train and workout but had a fear of being far from home by myself for medical reasons.  The teams response to that was SAY NO MORE, before I could think twice Eddie brought over a bike trainer so that I could train from the comfort of my home.   Now I could only do 10-15 mins initially but it was a start. I kept up with convo in our group chat with everybody talk about workouts and races.  This began to ignite a fire inside of me that could not be quenched. With me being able to do more riding I started riding outside again. Then went from riding to running again. I began to share this info with the team and they encouraged me every step of the way.  Eddie told me that it was in the suffering that I would grow and eventually maximize on my potential so I kept working.  I decided to show a more vulnerable side of my process thru showing me at a chemo session.  My point was to show that although it seems extremely bad I’m still going to find the good in all of this, smile and take it in stride.  The team got me a t shirt with everyone’s signature and get well soon cards that fired my passion all the more.  What many don’t realize is that had I not been exercising my recovery would have been 100x’s slower than what it has been.  But what DT didn’t realize is that my passion came from them my fire came from words of encouragement, my zest zeal and drive stemmed from their competitive spirit.  So I owe my healing and recovery to District Tri I am forever grateful for their love and support.  For the pushing me to be the best athlete I will forever love my tribe my squad DISTRICT TRI!” – Joseph “JB” Covington

Hey everyone! Yayo here with a recap of the Quantco Sprint Triathlon! I am a first year triathlete and this was my 4th (and favorite) race of the year so far.

Packet pick up was the Friday before the race at the Marine Corps Marathon (MCM) headquarters building from 7:30 am – 7:00 pm. Swim caps, bibs, tattoos and even the timing chips were included, which made for a smooth race day. There were even a few gels and granola bars to grab on the way out. It was really cool to see all of the medals and memorabilia detailing the history of MCM and talk to some of the people who worked there. 

The race took place at the Officer Candidates School on the Quantico Marine Base in Quantico, VA on Saturday, August 26 and featured a sprint distance triathlon and 12 K run. It was a little chilly before the start of the race, but the water was warm enough to make it non-wetsuit legal. District Tri was DEEP with 10 athletes competing! Our pre-race warm up consisted of applying race numbers prior to the swim start (note to self: do this the night before) and dancing with the Marine Corp mascots, because you gotta loosen up.

After the national anthem and a quick prayer it was time to race! The half mile swim course was well marked and easy to navigate. Male and female athletes were grouped in waves by their 750 M swim time. It was a little rough swimming with some of the guys and I caught a few elbows, but I held my own and left a few of them in my wake. 

The transition area was only a short distance from the swim and bike. It was well spaced out and they provided water inside. It also gave spectators a front row seat to the action and take some great photos and videos.

The scenic 20 K bike course took us all around the base. There was a race crew who went out the day before the race to make sure that any large debris was removed from the course. They even marked all the major potholes, which was a HUGE plus! The course featured a solid mix of hills, straight aways and a massive downhill where people clocked speeds over 35 mph! 

The run started out going across a bridge and continued along a gravel trail through the woods. Aside from getting to the top of the bridge, there weren’t any major hills to conquer. The best part of the run for me was seeing my teammates on the other side of the trail! We all shouted and gave each other high-fives which gave me some extra motivation to keep up the pace. The turnaround for the 5K  also merged with the the last leg of the 12K. It was great to see all the runners and triathletes give each other that final push through to the finish line together.

Approaching the finish line, you were surrounded by the cheers of spectators on both sides and the post race festival was in full swing. After you picked up your finisher medal, you were given a bag full of water, sports drinks, fruits and other post race snacks. Race sponsors were giving out lots of goodies (hello water bottles!), including a raffle to win an iPad mini and some free Jersey Mike’s subs. There was even some post race grill action and a free beer for the athletes (which, after the medal, is a major factor of my race selection process) Oh, and they were giving out free CASES – not boxes – of Girl Scout cookies. We all went home very happy.

Special shout out to Tazer Tay for completing his first open water swim and Marcus Fitts for placing 2nd in his age group! I also have to shout out the cheer squad for coming out early in the morning to keep everyone motivated. They always bring the best snacks, find the best spots to post up along the course and take the best race photos!

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this race.  It was very well organized and budget friendly. I enjoyed racing on a Saturday morning and not having to travel too far away from home. After competing on a very flat course, a very hilly course and in a super sprint, Quantico truly offers a challenge for the novice and seasoned athlete alike. The MCM staff and volunteers were located all throughout the course and were very helpful and supportive. The athletes were great (I saw someone stop to help another biker who was having some issues) and the overall energy at the race was high. This was also my first time racing with a large group of teammates! I’d highly recommend this race for the newbie looking to turn it up a notch or the veteran looking for some serious competition – or anyone looking to go FAST!

Triathlons are no longer thought of as a crazy sport for super fit people racing Ironman distances. It is now known that there are many options for the everyday person to get involved in the sport if they desire. I began doing triathlons in August 2014. Like many others, I didn’t think of triathlons as something that was possible for me to do. Yes, I did local races, but I never thought I was fit enough to do a triathlon. Aside from that, I didn’t own a bike and I barely knew how to swim. I was comfortable with the water and could go in the deep end, but growing up in Philly, swimming laps just wasn’t something people in my neighborhood did. When running, I felt bored with no real goal to reach. Plus, I wanted to give my body some kind of rest but wanted to continue with my cardio… And that’s how triathlons were made for me. I quickly fell in love with the sport, the people, and everything that came along with being a triathlete. From that point on, triathlon wasn’t just something I did to pass time, it became a part of my life.

 

Luckily I had a few others that were just as curious about the sport as I was so we were able to learn together, but I still wish I knew a few things before jumping in head first. With that in mind, here are five things you should know before you tri:

 

  1. There are different distances to choose from.
    1. As previously mentioned, triathlons are not just the full Ironman distance, which consists of a 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike and a 26.2 mile run. The most common distance options you’ll have to choose from are Sprint, Olympic/International and Half Ironman.
      1. The Sprint distance can vary from race to race, but your typical distance will be a 750 meter swim, 12 mile bike and a 3.1 mile run. This option is great for athletes that are new to the sport and want to test their limits. You’ll also find a lot of faster athletes in this distance as folks try to exert all of their energy in such a short distance.
      2. The Olympic distance is usually 1500 meter swim, 25 mile bike and a 6.2 mile run. This option is best for the athlete that is familiar with the sport and would like to do a bit more than the Sprint distance. The Olympic distance is also referred to as the International distance as it’s the most common option, regardless of country. This is also the distance that is performed by the athletes during the Olympic Games.
      3. The Half Ironman, or 70.3, distance does not change, unlike the Sprint and Olympic options. No matter the race, this distance will be a 1.2 mile swim, 56 mile bike and a 13.1 mile run. This is when folks begin to take things a bit more serious because at this distance, you’re not trying to figure out if you like the sport or not. More than likely you’ve done a few races before getting to a 70.3, spent some money on things that’ll make you a bit faster, and the sport has somewhat taken over your life!
      4. And lastly, the most commonly known triathlon event, the Ironman, consists of a 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike and a 26.2 mile run. At this point you’re actually crazy. When you get to thinking of doing a 140.6 (Full Ironman) you should make an appointment with a therapist because there may be something wrong with you! If you need a recommendation just let me know, my therapist and I have discussed this more than enough times!

 

  1. Triathlons are expensive!
    1. If you’ve been participating in swimming, biking OR running events then you’re already familiar with how expensive that can be. That’s only one sport! You’ll be swimming, biking AND running at these events, so the registration prices will reflect that. With that in mind, make sure you create a race budget. Once you figure that out, multiply the amount times two. Between the races, travel, race nutrition and gear, you’ll want to make sure you’re prepared to have a successful race season. You don’t want to get to mid-season and realize you’ve spent all of the money you’ve set aside for races. Plus, if you don’t spend it all you can apply it to next year’s season because I’m sure you’ll be racing a bit more! If nothing else, you’ll just have the extra money and who doesn’t like having extra money?!

 

  1. You don’t NEED all of the cool gadgets to race!
    1. Folks get caught up in thinking they need everything that everyone else has that’s doing this sport. You don’t! Don’t go out and spend a ton of money on a bike! Use the bike that you already have, or find yourself an inexpensive bike that you can use until you find out if you actually like the sport. Having a tri-suit is great, but you don’t NEED one to race. Get a swimsuit to swim in, throw a pair of cheap bike shorts on for the ride, then slip those off (keeping on the swim suit) and put on some shorts to run in. Or just ride and run in the same shorts. It may not be the most comfortable thing but you’ll be able to get the race done without spending $100 for a tri-suit. Long story short, keep it as minimal as possible until you know for sure that you want to keep racing.

 

  1. Depending on where you live, triathlons race during a 4-5 month period but is a 12 month sport.
    1. The thing I love most about being a triathlete is that I can train all year. I don’t need to train as much during the offseason, but 12 months a year my training is geared around my season. Being up north, we have a period between June and September where we can race comfortably. That doesn’t mean that I don’t train any other month, but those are the months where my training is focused around racing. During the other months I am able to focus more on technique, or strength training, or anything else to keep my endurance up prior to “pre-season”, which for me typically starts in April at the latest. As a reference, here are some free training plans you can use if you’re looking to participate in a Sprint, Olympic, Half or Full Ironman triathlon:
      1. Sprint: 10 Week Training Plan
      2. Olympic: 10 Week Training Program
      3. Half Ironman: 18 Week Training Program
      4. Full Ironman: Six Month Training Program

 

  1. Your friendships and relationships WILL change!
    1. This is one that often gets overlooked, but is indeed the most important one of them all. As you get into triathlons you’ll quickly learn how much things change. Your body changes, your diet changes, your schedule changes and your relationships change. This is extremely difficult for most triathletes, because it’s easy to fall in love with the sport. That’s great, but there are only 24 hours in a day. As you become more involved in the sport you’ll quickly learn that most of those 24 hours are spent training or recovering. This is how you develop deeper relationships with the folks that you train with. If you’re lucky, you’ll find a team to be a part of like District Triathlon where you all may go for a swim, bike and/or run together then grab a bite to eat or have a drink. While this is all well and good, what does it mean for the friends that you have that aren’t into the sport of triathlon? That’s an individual question for every athlete and there’s no one answer.

 

Now take it a step further and think of this in terms of a marriage. It’s a very difficult thing! A great read on this topic is “Triathlete Love: You Tri, Your Spouse Doesn’t” by Susan Lacke. I can write a full post about that, but long story short, know and do what works best for you and the relationships that you care most about.

 

So while there are plenty more things that you will learn about the sport of triathlon, I hope that these few things help you as you begin your journey of becoming a triathlete!

 

Be>Yesterday