Ironman 70.3 Wilmington, North Carolina 2017
Alright! Here is my race report on my very first half Ironman 70.3 in Wilmington, NC! I’ll try to keep it short, but detailed! This is literally my first year in triathlons and ultimately learning how to swim, so crossing this finish line was a big deal! Here’s what I learned going into it, and a few takeaways from a newbie perspective. I won’t go in depth on my nutrition, but will keep this specifically about the race itself.
The setup:
If you can get there at least two days ahead to make the early check in option, do it! We had two days of checking in prior to race day. Thursday self checking, Friday self and gear check in. There were three bags we had to pack: bike gear, run gear, and morning clothes bag.
  1. Bike gear: This bag was everything for your bike which you’ll replace with swim gear. This was also the ONLY bag we would get to race morning. Friday I checked in my bike (first one of course…newbie jitters!), clip shoes, helmet, shades, gloves etc…Bike check in was Friday only. No bikes were allowed morning of. Early Saturday morning I went to get numbered and make final placements of bike essentials (my fluids and nutrition). You could have brought it all on Saturday, but I didn’t want a hand full of things on race day.
  2. Run bag: This bag would be switched out for bike gear. We could NOT get to this bag race day. So if you wear socks don’t forget them. Don’t forget your bib and shades! This was the only bag I pre-staged my fluids/ nutrition.
  3. Morning clothes bag: Literally just that. It was nice to to keep on warm clothes and ditch them as our respective waves were called. They had collection bags for us to place them in, and shuttle back to the start.
  4. Everything you exchanged has to go in the bag for transport. Label everything you deem important. This way if it falls out the item would still make its way back. Bike gear and morning clothes bags were collected and brought to the finish line. The bike and bike bag was collected by ourselves (or trusted designated person).
Coming in early, I was able to really think things out Thursday night, but it also gave me an extra day to shop in case I left something. The expo was also very calm on Thursday with some one-on-one time asking questions. 🗣ATTEND THE ATHLETE MEETING! They answered everything! From the routes to what you could get penalties on. Go and listen. It doesn’t hurt to get free advice. The presenter was extremely patient with the amount of first timers that were in the room.
The Swim:
Estimated time: 52-55min
Actual time: 36min 47sec 😱
Okay…this swim is fast!! Not only was it wetsuit legal, but we were swimming with the current and can definitely feel it. Keep buoys to you left and go. (Works well for left side dominant breathers) . It still felt like forever, but as soon as I said “geesh how much longer?!” it was over! I felt my sighting was better this time. I didn’t swim 100yds in the wrong direction or have a kayak person ask me if I’m okay. Main goal was to not get scooped out. We ultimately lucked up and had a gorgeous race day weather. No storm or hurricanes to make the water choppy. The current was so smooth. No creature. No jellyfish. No big fish. A few people touched my toes, but that helped me get it together. I did like that the route was wide and not a lot of people were swimming all over the place. The water? 71 degrees and Very SALTY water! Whatever your method is to deal with saltwater utilize it. They had a sprinkler we ran under, but it didn’t make a big difference.

T1: 6min 27sec
I lost some time here. We ran from the pier, across the street, down a shoot that took us half way around all the bikes and in. My bike was somewhere deep in the middle, so make moves! I wouldn’t take transitions for granted. A lot of time can be lost. When you swim in there are plenty of ladders to get out, and people were pulling us up. I also used the wetsuit strippers and they were fast! At first I wasn’t going to, but I’m glad I did. Make sure your garmin is on the inside of your suit!!

The Bike:
Estimated time: 3hr 45min
Actual time: 3hr 24min 7sec
Yay me! Shaved 23min off my time! Route is super flat, but sometimes flat isn’t always good. This means you’re actually pedaling the ENTIRE time. Nothing to coast or glide. On the bridges there were a few grates to cross, which meant to slow down. Please adhere to the volunteers and their warnings. Some did not slow down and crashed. I saw saw a few competitors with bruised faces, they crashed, and faced having to stop racing altogether. The grates started within the first good 5miles or so. You can bet a lot of people started to sloooow dooown after seeing that! Take your time, but race your race. The time is easy to make up. Overall good bike route. Was a bit annoyed they put a nice little hill right at the very end as you’re trying to shake out your legs instead. It didn’t help (for me) to recover, but I finished strong as possible.

T2: 5:01
The bike dismount was at the base of a hill which was a deal to work with. Again we ran all the way around the bikes and in. The rest was my fault. I spent a lot of time just getting stuff out of the bags. Not having a tri mat makes it a little harder to grab-N-go. So I’ll say really have what you need in there. Don’t guess around about it. I am going to incorporate taking things out of bags for my brick training. I can say I was not expecting not having my tri mat.

Run:
Estimated time: 2hrs
Actual time: 2hrs 7min 47sec
You guessed it! A little irritated by my time, but I’m not a big biker and my legs were still getting over that last hill. I can say I wasn’t prepared for a push prior to the run. Biking is now my weakest event. I took a minute to stretch, some nutrition, and eased back into it. Thankfully my legs worked themselves out!! I purposely took it slow the first 4, but after that turned it up heading to 6, the turnaround, and back. The water stations were appropriately placed and stocked with good fruits, salty food, and other carbs. It wasn’t too hot or hilly just slightly inclined.

Finish line:
AMAZING!! What a rush to hit the Ironman red carpet, all the banners, and official Ironman arch. Coming in I heard my parents, and a fellow teammate cheering so I ran harder! The announcer called my name as a first timer and I was done. Standing there I just looked at everyone realizing what we just did!! It’s done! Just like that! Can’t truly put in words the atmosphere and feeling of this moment, but take a minute and let it soak in. I grabbed my hat and medal, made way to take my finisher photo, and greeted the fam. They always make it to my “first” time in going something. It is also a thing that no one puts on my medal, but my dad if he’s there. So awesome seeing him, Mom, and teammate at the end. That really makes a difference.
Conclusion/ Overall/ Take always:
So if you skipped down for the “so what” of things, here’s the down and dirty. Overall amazing race! This was so organized, people were friendly answering questions, and the volunteers made it happen! If you can get there on a Thursday for a Saturday race do it! Take your time packing and be thorough in labeling. I liked that the swim was a straight line, the bike was a down and around, and the run was a down and back. The routes didn’t have you on some crazy hamster loop passing something 3-4 times. This will most likely be your fastest swim. The bike, although flat, was a push and adhere to the warnings! Run and enjoy! The run was pretty smooth, self explanatory, well marked on when to turn.
Most of all have FUN!! Roughly 2800 competitors were out there! I got to meet some incredible athletes and connected with some familiar faces. I had so much fun just enjoying the atmosphere! Truly trust your training. Stay calm and know that you’re ready.  As a first time swimmer I really wanted to do well, and I did which I’m very proud of! Now I have to bring up my biking! Bottom line I would definitely recommend this race for anyone especially first-timers wanting to break into the Ironman Half world!
 
Injuries: None
Lost items: Goggles
Forgotten items: Forgot to put on bike gloves
Training switch: practice taking items out of bags for transitions
Travel: Amtrak -Travel to and from the race was smooth. Amtrak gives bike passengers priority boarding on longer distances. I was able to lock up my bike in a special bike compartment under the train, and find my seat before any other passengers boarded. Chicago Union station was less than 2 miles from the race expo and registration.
Packet Pick up: Saturday Morning packet pick up was seamless. Bikes were welcome in the host hotel. Bike valet volunteers on checked bikes, allowing athletes to attend the mandatory briefing and the expo without worrying on where to put their bikes. Race participants must attend pre-race info sessions prior to picking up registration packets. Info sessions were held every 30 minutes, after which, hand stamps were provided. Hand stamps acted as a ticket to packet pickup. Packet pickup was smooth, well organized and unremarkable.
Bike Check-in: Unlike some other triathlons, participants were allowed to drop off bikes the day before (by 5pm) or bring bikes to checkin the day of the event. While the flexibility was appreciated, this, along with the fact that bikes weren’t required to be racked in numerical order, created race-morning chaos (more on that later). Bike check-in was about a mile walk from the expo and was straight forward. Check-in was for bikes only, other gear needed to be brought on race day. Unlike other Lifetime triathlons, Tri bags were allowed (though space was extremely limited) on race day.
Race day: I arrived at the transition at 4:45am which gave me ample time to setup my transition area and beat the crowd well before transition closed at 5:30. As mentioned above, this race did not require bikes to be numerically checked in (eg. rows would say 1500 – 1600 and participants within that number range could rack their bike wherever they saw fit in that general area. At about 5:00am, people who had not checked their bikes in the night before began arriving and moving bikes and complaining that there was nowhere to setup their transition.
**At the mandatory briefing one race vet stated that he usually tied a bandana around the rail underneath his bike. This serves the duel purpose of marking one’s territory in the morning and making the transition area a little more visible during the race. I also keep a small flashlight in my tri bag. This came in handy as it was pitch black when I arrived at transition and the area was not very well lit.
Race course and conditions
Swim – Water conditions were choppy but temperate. The water was 72 degrees and the weather was overcast and mid seventies. The swim course for the Olympic distance was in the shape of the letter “J” -swimmers swam north, made a u-turn around a buoy, and swam south along the sea wall to the swim exit. Sprinters swam in straight line along the sea wall to the exit. The water was rough, but the water but clear and of seemingly good quality. The swim was awesome for spectators as they could see the entire length of the swim. Swim start was in waves separated in 4 minute intervals. Each wave of athletes entered together and treaded water for approximately 2 minutes prior to the start of their race. I preferred this type of start because it allowed me to get acclimated to the water prior to taking off. It would not be an understatement to say that 98% of the swimmers wore wetsuits. In the 2-hour period between the start of the event and the start of my heat, I only saw two other people without a wetsuit (for context, one person wore stars and stripes themed Speedos and the other old school swim trunks that went down past the knees). The distance from the swim exit to bike transition was from 1/4 up to 1/2 a mile depending on where a competitor’s bike was racked.
Bike – Road conditions were smooth and the course was generally fast and flat. There may have been one or two significant hills on the 25 mile Olympic course. By far my favorite part of the race was the underground portion of the bike. This portion of the race was wide, smooth, dark and hot, but invited riders to go all out. I was  saddened but not surprised to hear of the riders being hit by cars, much of the course was on the highway with only cones separating 2 bike lanes.
Run – The run was flat, narrow, and spectator friendly. Runners ran along Lake Michigan and turned around at either the 1.5 or 3 mile mark. Water and gatorade were available at just about every mile.
The finish line was about a mile from transition and trolley’s were provided to get competitors and spectators alike back to the race start.
Final Thoughts
Overall the race was a great experience. The folks at Lifetime know what they are doing. There are great race perks (free pictures and an app for cyber supporters to track their triathletes, food after the race, and a race sponsored car with the name of every competitor on it). The medals while formulaic (both Chicago and New York’s medals feature a monument on the left and the host city’s skyline encircled in the center) are good looking and substantial in size and heft. If I had to nitpick, I’d say the race shirt’s design seems like an uninspired afterthought. Availability permitting, I’d love to return to do this race in the future.

Hey everyone! Yayo here with a recap of the Quantco Sprint Triathlon! I am a first year triathlete and this was my 4th (and favorite) race of the year so far.

Packet pick up was the Friday before the race at the Marine Corps Marathon (MCM) headquarters building from 7:30 am – 7:00 pm. Swim caps, bibs, tattoos and even the timing chips were included, which made for a smooth race day. There were even a few gels and granola bars to grab on the way out. It was really cool to see all of the medals and memorabilia detailing the history of MCM and talk to some of the people who worked there. 

The race took place at the Officer Candidates School on the Quantico Marine Base in Quantico, VA on Saturday, August 26 and featured a sprint distance triathlon and 12 K run. It was a little chilly before the start of the race, but the water was warm enough to make it non-wetsuit legal. District Tri was DEEP with 10 athletes competing! Our pre-race warm up consisted of applying race numbers prior to the swim start (note to self: do this the night before) and dancing with the Marine Corp mascots, because you gotta loosen up.

After the national anthem and a quick prayer it was time to race! The half mile swim course was well marked and easy to navigate. Male and female athletes were grouped in waves by their 750 M swim time. It was a little rough swimming with some of the guys and I caught a few elbows, but I held my own and left a few of them in my wake. 

The transition area was only a short distance from the swim and bike. It was well spaced out and they provided water inside. It also gave spectators a front row seat to the action and take some great photos and videos.

The scenic 20 K bike course took us all around the base. There was a race crew who went out the day before the race to make sure that any large debris was removed from the course. They even marked all the major potholes, which was a HUGE plus! The course featured a solid mix of hills, straight aways and a massive downhill where people clocked speeds over 35 mph! 

The run started out going across a bridge and continued along a gravel trail through the woods. Aside from getting to the top of the bridge, there weren’t any major hills to conquer. The best part of the run for me was seeing my teammates on the other side of the trail! We all shouted and gave each other high-fives which gave me some extra motivation to keep up the pace. The turnaround for the 5K  also merged with the the last leg of the 12K. It was great to see all the runners and triathletes give each other that final push through to the finish line together.

Approaching the finish line, you were surrounded by the cheers of spectators on both sides and the post race festival was in full swing. After you picked up your finisher medal, you were given a bag full of water, sports drinks, fruits and other post race snacks. Race sponsors were giving out lots of goodies (hello water bottles!), including a raffle to win an iPad mini and some free Jersey Mike’s subs. There was even some post race grill action and a free beer for the athletes (which, after the medal, is a major factor of my race selection process) Oh, and they were giving out free CASES – not boxes – of Girl Scout cookies. We all went home very happy.

Special shout out to Tazer Tay for completing his first open water swim and Marcus Fitts for placing 2nd in his age group! I also have to shout out the cheer squad for coming out early in the morning to keep everyone motivated. They always bring the best snacks, find the best spots to post up along the course and take the best race photos!

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this race.  It was very well organized and budget friendly. I enjoyed racing on a Saturday morning and not having to travel too far away from home. After competing on a very flat course, a very hilly course and in a super sprint, Quantico truly offers a challenge for the novice and seasoned athlete alike. The MCM staff and volunteers were located all throughout the course and were very helpful and supportive. The athletes were great (I saw someone stop to help another biker who was having some issues) and the overall energy at the race was high. This was also my first time racing with a large group of teammates! I’d highly recommend this race for the newbie looking to turn it up a notch or the veteran looking for some serious competition – or anyone looking to go FAST!

Hey what’s up! My name is Carl Alleyne and this is my first season doing triathlons. The New Jersey State Tri is my third one so I wouldn’t consider myself a beginner but I’m definitely not a seasoned tri veteran either like some of my District Tri teammates.

A District Tri teammate of mine highly suggested the New Jersey State Triathlon so I chose it among the 4 that I registered for in the beginning of the year. He dubbed it as a flat course that was very ideal for fast times. Why the heck not! When I registered, I neglected to pay attention to the “pick race packet up on race day” option. It cost $15 but would’ve saved me some gas. I camped out in Philly at a family member’s house so it would’ve been nice not to have to drive to Trenton the day before the race. I don’t think I’ll be staying at a family member’s house the day before a race again haha. Nothing bad happened but they just don’t understand that I had an endurance race the next day. They “forced” me to eat bbq food which I’m sure wasn’t optimal for a triathlon haha. Furthermore, I had to pry myself away during late night catch up talk to get some sleep.

On flip side, picking up my race day packet on Friday made Saturday race a lot more smooth. I parked my car, placed my chip around my ankle, set up my bike/bike helmet stickers and was ready to head to the transition area. As soon as you walked into the marine park, they had volunteers ready to bib # body mark you on the way to transition. Very efficient! The transition area space for each racer was pretty standard although there was over 1370 sprint racers so the transition area itself was huge!! I did notice the lower number bibs were closer to the bike out exit which was preferable for me.

Onto the race conditions…They weren’t too bad considering it was an east coast race in July. The temperature was around 90 degrees but wasn’t too humid. The water was a non-legal wetsuit temperature of 88 degrees. The designated swim warm up area gave me a feel of just how warm doing a sprint in bath tub warm water would be.

The race day vibe was pretty incredible compared to the other two triathlons I did this year. They had a jumbotron with candid video of triathletes preparing for the race. Well-positioned loud speakers kept the music blasting before and during the race. The announcer was very upbeat and funny as well. The expo sold standard tri/endurance race items but was nothing to brag about.

For the actual race, the crowd and announcer got even more excitable than pre-race. As each race wave was called to the lake, volunteers blew out that Miami Hurricane football pre-game smoke to usher you into the water. Pretty cool! The course was very well marked with orange floats every 30 meters to pave the way. My wave had 60 racers in it so I already knew to get to the side as I’m not the fastest swimmer but also not the slowest. It didn’t actually matter because as soon as the horn blew for us to begin we all clumped up together. It was definitely my toughest open water swim. No exaggeration, I either hit someone or someone hit me every two strokes. There were few times that I remember being able to get into a smooth swimming groove. I had to catch myself and pause about 3 times. Not because I got tired but because my stroke was thrown off that much from physical contact with the other swimmers. It made for a difficult swim but I had still had fun. After the 500 meter swim, you exited onto a man-made sand strip leading to the transition area. That was great because that’s better than running barefoot on wet grass in my opinion. The swim-in transition distance wasn’t far at all. However, the transition area-to-bike out distance was pretty lengthy. I guessed the race organizers sacrificed the short swim-to-transition distance for the transition-to-bike mount distance. The bike course was short (11.5 miles) and relatively flat (it contained some false flats but nothing that I would remotely even call a hill even for a beginner biker). It was mostly flat which did make for several lengths of getting into good unabated sprints. Being my third triathlon and the fact I’ve been putting in some significant “saddle” time, I could see a false flat coming up and adjust my gears accordingly. Unlike other rides I’ve been on. Unfortunately, I underestimated how much the water temp and the 90 degree heat had on water loss and didn’t drink nearly as much as I should’ve during the bike portion. All in all, I felt good with a half mile to go on the bike and thought I could pull a good run time. The bike-to-transition distance was again, quite lengthy but not overwhelming. The only non-positive thing I noticed during the whole course was the amount of turns one had to make in order to get out of the transition area and onto the actual main running course. One of the volunteers even got turned around and directed me the wrong way which I wasn’t too happy about. However, they and my cheering teammate quickly got me on the right track. The running trail went through the park and also contained a couple false flats. Being the newbie I am, I went out a little too hard on the first mile and that made even the slightest rise in elevation very noticeable. I’d say about 60-70% of the sprint run course was shaded. Awesome because I didn’t feel like I was going to overheat.  The enthusiastic water station volunteers were set up all along the course. They even had a sprinkler set up half way through which was optional to run through. The finish was great as it was very well attended by volunteers and spectators cheering on everybody. The loud speaker music and confetti from the volunteers gave me that extra push to finish hard the last .35 miles. In fact, I ran at such a fast pace during that last segment, it made me wonder if I wasn’t running as hard as I could’ve been during the rest of the course. I’ll chalk it up to the race finish adrenaline haha.

As soon as you finish, they have volunteers ready to take racing chip themselves, hand you your hard earned medal and direct you to the shower/sprinkler tent. Man, the sprinkler shower was God sent!! Best part of the race hahaha. Certainly, a much need cool down and got me in a relaxed state. Everyone was very friendly as several racers I “met” along the course spoke to me afterward. The food was pretty standard, except that caramel cookie. Delicious!! Although I didn’t hit my goals, I improved in terms of time/pace on each portion. I know that was, in part, due to the great race course set up. All in all, The New Jersey State Tri was a great race experience and I would definitely recommend it as a future team race.

Triathlons are no longer thought of as a crazy sport for super fit people racing Ironman distances. It is now known that there are many options for the everyday person to get involved in the sport if they desire. I began doing triathlons in August 2014. Like many others, I didn’t think of triathlons as something that was possible for me to do. Yes, I did local races, but I never thought I was fit enough to do a triathlon. Aside from that, I didn’t own a bike and I barely knew how to swim. I was comfortable with the water and could go in the deep end, but growing up in Philly, swimming laps just wasn’t something people in my neighborhood did. When running, I felt bored with no real goal to reach. Plus, I wanted to give my body some kind of rest but wanted to continue with my cardio… And that’s how triathlons were made for me. I quickly fell in love with the sport, the people, and everything that came along with being a triathlete. From that point on, triathlon wasn’t just something I did to pass time, it became a part of my life.

 

Luckily I had a few others that were just as curious about the sport as I was so we were able to learn together, but I still wish I knew a few things before jumping in head first. With that in mind, here are five things you should know before you tri:

 

  1. There are different distances to choose from.
    1. As previously mentioned, triathlons are not just the full Ironman distance, which consists of a 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike and a 26.2 mile run. The most common distance options you’ll have to choose from are Sprint, Olympic/International and Half Ironman.
      1. The Sprint distance can vary from race to race, but your typical distance will be a 750 meter swim, 12 mile bike and a 3.1 mile run. This option is great for athletes that are new to the sport and want to test their limits. You’ll also find a lot of faster athletes in this distance as folks try to exert all of their energy in such a short distance.
      2. The Olympic distance is usually 1500 meter swim, 25 mile bike and a 6.2 mile run. This option is best for the athlete that is familiar with the sport and would like to do a bit more than the Sprint distance. The Olympic distance is also referred to as the International distance as it’s the most common option, regardless of country. This is also the distance that is performed by the athletes during the Olympic Games.
      3. The Half Ironman, or 70.3, distance does not change, unlike the Sprint and Olympic options. No matter the race, this distance will be a 1.2 mile swim, 56 mile bike and a 13.1 mile run. This is when folks begin to take things a bit more serious because at this distance, you’re not trying to figure out if you like the sport or not. More than likely you’ve done a few races before getting to a 70.3, spent some money on things that’ll make you a bit faster, and the sport has somewhat taken over your life!
      4. And lastly, the most commonly known triathlon event, the Ironman, consists of a 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike and a 26.2 mile run. At this point you’re actually crazy. When you get to thinking of doing a 140.6 (Full Ironman) you should make an appointment with a therapist because there may be something wrong with you! If you need a recommendation just let me know, my therapist and I have discussed this more than enough times!

 

  1. Triathlons are expensive!
    1. If you’ve been participating in swimming, biking OR running events then you’re already familiar with how expensive that can be. That’s only one sport! You’ll be swimming, biking AND running at these events, so the registration prices will reflect that. With that in mind, make sure you create a race budget. Once you figure that out, multiply the amount times two. Between the races, travel, race nutrition and gear, you’ll want to make sure you’re prepared to have a successful race season. You don’t want to get to mid-season and realize you’ve spent all of the money you’ve set aside for races. Plus, if you don’t spend it all you can apply it to next year’s season because I’m sure you’ll be racing a bit more! If nothing else, you’ll just have the extra money and who doesn’t like having extra money?!

 

  1. You don’t NEED all of the cool gadgets to race!
    1. Folks get caught up in thinking they need everything that everyone else has that’s doing this sport. You don’t! Don’t go out and spend a ton of money on a bike! Use the bike that you already have, or find yourself an inexpensive bike that you can use until you find out if you actually like the sport. Having a tri-suit is great, but you don’t NEED one to race. Get a swimsuit to swim in, throw a pair of cheap bike shorts on for the ride, then slip those off (keeping on the swim suit) and put on some shorts to run in. Or just ride and run in the same shorts. It may not be the most comfortable thing but you’ll be able to get the race done without spending $100 for a tri-suit. Long story short, keep it as minimal as possible until you know for sure that you want to keep racing.

 

  1. Depending on where you live, triathlons race during a 4-5 month period but is a 12 month sport.
    1. The thing I love most about being a triathlete is that I can train all year. I don’t need to train as much during the offseason, but 12 months a year my training is geared around my season. Being up north, we have a period between June and September where we can race comfortably. That doesn’t mean that I don’t train any other month, but those are the months where my training is focused around racing. During the other months I am able to focus more on technique, or strength training, or anything else to keep my endurance up prior to “pre-season”, which for me typically starts in April at the latest. As a reference, here are some free training plans you can use if you’re looking to participate in a Sprint, Olympic, Half or Full Ironman triathlon:
      1. Sprint: 10 Week Training Plan
      2. Olympic: 10 Week Training Program
      3. Half Ironman: 18 Week Training Program
      4. Full Ironman: Six Month Training Program

 

  1. Your friendships and relationships WILL change!
    1. This is one that often gets overlooked, but is indeed the most important one of them all. As you get into triathlons you’ll quickly learn how much things change. Your body changes, your diet changes, your schedule changes and your relationships change. This is extremely difficult for most triathletes, because it’s easy to fall in love with the sport. That’s great, but there are only 24 hours in a day. As you become more involved in the sport you’ll quickly learn that most of those 24 hours are spent training or recovering. This is how you develop deeper relationships with the folks that you train with. If you’re lucky, you’ll find a team to be a part of like District Triathlon where you all may go for a swim, bike and/or run together then grab a bite to eat or have a drink. While this is all well and good, what does it mean for the friends that you have that aren’t into the sport of triathlon? That’s an individual question for every athlete and there’s no one answer.

 

Now take it a step further and think of this in terms of a marriage. It’s a very difficult thing! A great read on this topic is “Triathlete Love: You Tri, Your Spouse Doesn’t” by Susan Lacke. I can write a full post about that, but long story short, know and do what works best for you and the relationships that you care most about.

 

So while there are plenty more things that you will learn about the sport of triathlon, I hope that these few things help you as you begin your journey of becoming a triathlete!

 

Be>Yesterday

Getting and staying in shape is hard work, but nobody said it has to be lonely. In fact, experts agree that working out with a group not only holds you accountable, but it breaks up the monotony that often leads to boredom when working out alone. Enter District Tri. Last October I met up with a friend who I had not regularly seen since we trained together for a Tough Mudder a few years ago. I told him that I’d had some false starts getting back on the fitness horse but that I intended to get back in gear. He told me to be on the lookout for an invitation to a chat group for a crew of folks he’d begun swimming with. The group, I later learned, was a recently formed triathlon club comprised mostly of high energy Tri newbies dedicated to supporting members of all skill levels while breaking down the barriers that traditionally keep people of color to less than 1% of the multisport community. After one swim, I was hooked.

Since my first swim, I have logged more miles in the pool this winter than the prior three seasons combined. As an unintended benefit, I have learned from others and have had the opportunity to share some of the things I have picked up along the way. Weekly swims are filled with spirited competition and genuine support. Swimmers of all skill levels are welcomed and the team’s captain, Marcus, does a great job of mixing up workouts to get the most out of the team.

Out of the pool activities include runs, bikes,  boot camps, bonding activities, community service, and yes, triathlons. I’m all in this year and have committed to compete in 5 triathlons this summer (Rock Hall, Escape Philly, NYC, Nations, and Quantico). With the 2017 tri season set to kick off I find myself looking forward to dropping pounds, logging gains, laughing and making friends along the way.

By Dedan Bruner: https://inmediasres2.wordpress.com

It’s that time of year again! District Triathlon is kicking off its first full year this month. So much has happened in a short period of time. We’ve grown the team from 2 members to 76 members in a couple months, acquired multiple partners & sponsors, trained, competed, won USA TRIATHLON club grant and had a dope ass time while doing it.

Triathlon is an exciting sport but it can be gear heavy and expensive. Not only are athletes asked to master 3 athletic disciplines but make sure the gear necessary with each is up to par good quality and dependable. I’ve only been in the sport for 2.5 years and coaching for even less. I’ve learned alot and still learning cool tips and tricks to make for faster transitions and being better prepared for competition and race season. Below are gear I currently plan on using through out the season (not all necessarily at the same time). I try to keep my gear as simple as possible. I’ve broken it down into 3 categories:

 

SWIMMING:

Swimsuit: TYR Viper Jammer Suit: This is my daily go to suit. Not too expensive and wont break the bank. USA Triathlon members get a decent discount at TYR.
Goggles: Speedo Vanquisher:  I’ve been using these googles since high school. Get them and you wont be disappointed.
Swim Cap: Random Race Caps
Pool Swim Watch: Garmin Forerunner 920XT– It does everything I want from a GPS watch. Not the prettiest of the bunch. The Garmin Fenix 3 would be my ultimate choice… but the way my bank account is setup….
Drills – Swimmer Snorkel: FINIS Swimmer’s Snorkel – This is useful for balance drills primarily, allowing me to focus on position (looking at hands, etc…) without having to come up for air
Openwater – Wetsuit: Orca Open Water – I don’t have alot of experience with wetsuits and typically compete in water too warm for wetsuit legal events.
Swim bag: Aeropek Dry Bag.

 

 

 

 

BIKING:

Triathlon Bike: Cannondale Carbon Slice 3 w/shimano 105 components. I’m looking to upgrade soon or atleast upgrade my components to dura ace.
Roadbike: Currently nothing. Looking for a good road bike.
Power Meter: Cycle Ops Power Tap G3 & Joule 2.0 powermeter.
Bike Shoes: Planet X 365X Pro Carbon Vernice Road Shoe : These beauties are amazing! Light comfortable, easy to get on and off and didn’t come with a huge price tag.
Race belt: FuelBelt GelReady Race Belt –  For races, to put your number on for the bike and run.  It also holds gels, though, not as well as I’d like.  Better just as a race belt for the number than a storage platform.

 

 

RUNNING:

Running Shoes: Adidas Alphabounce: I’m crazy surprised at how these have treated me over the 6 months I have used them.
Running T-Shirt: Whatever technical t-shirt I grab out of the massive drawer of dozens of them.  If you don’t have any running t-shirts, you’re not doing enough races. 😉
Running Shorts: Adidas supernova running shorts.. These things are solid. I usually stick to tights even in the summer but will grab these or nike dri-fit shorts. Cant go wrong with either.
Running Socks: 2xu compression socks. Never had a blister or painfully sore feet with these.
Running Watch: Garmin Forerunning 920XT:  I’m pretty happy with the tracks/accuracy I get.  When indoors I hook it up to the HR monitor.